Ondrej Krehel

Ondrej Krehel is the Founder of LIFARS, a global cybersecurity and digital forensics firm founded in 2014 with offices in New York City, Bratislava, London, Geneva, and Hong Kong. Mr. Krehel holds multiple professional designations and certifications, including that of Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP), Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA), Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) and Certified Ethical Hacker Instructor (CEI) for which Mr. Krehel is one of ten people in the United States to hold such professional status. In addition, in 2012 to 2013, Mr. Krehel served as Adjunct Professor, St. Johns University, teaching a broad spectrum of cyber security issues and solutions.

Mr. Krehel anchors and directs LIFARS' multi-faceted global team providing tailored cyber and digital security solutions ranging from emergency response, to assessment, to monitoring, to re-architecture, and re-building of multiple systems and networks.

Previously, Mr. Krehel served as the Chief Information Security Officer of Identity Theft 911 LLC from October 2009 until 2013. He has over a decade of network and computer security experience investigating intellectual property theft, massive deletions, defragmentation, anti-money laundering and computer hacking. Mr. Krehel has served as digital forensic examiner in the New York office of Stroz Friedberg, where he led computer security and forensics projects internationally and in the U.S., and was instrumental in detecting, investigating and combating intrusions and data breaches. Mr. Krehel also served as an IT technical security project leader at Loews Corporation, where he implemented technical security solutions, and was responsible for providing the first line of response for all cases involving the compromise of networking equipment, servers and end user machines. He began his career as a computer analyst at the government-owned utility company Slovenske Elektrarne A.S., in Bratislava, Slovakia, where he focused on information security and emergency security incident response for their nuclear, water energy and coal power plants.

Mr. Krehel is a member of the High Technology Crime Investigation Association (HTCIA), the Information Systems Security Certification Consortium (ISC) and the International Council of Electronic Commerce (EC Council). He has an M.S. degree in Mathematical Physics from Comenius University in Bratislava, and an Engineering Diploma from Technical University in Zvolen, Slovakia. He has also completed multiple courses in intrusion and forensics training, including Access Data Boot Camp and Niksun forensics training.

His professional work in cybersecurity and digital forensics has received media attention from CNN, Reuters, CNBC, Forbes, Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Mr. Krehel is a Speaker at the world's leading cybersecurity events for many years, including RSA in San Francisco, CEIC, HTCIA, RIMS, QuBit Prague, ICS South Africa, and is the author of numerous cyber industry articles.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Ondrej Krejel and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications, Inc., its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

Ransomware -- a sneaky, dangerous cyber threat

Tips on how to communicate with the board

Tips on how to communicate with the board

Clean and effective communication with the rest of the board members is vital to getting your cybersecurity agenda across.

The rise of LinkedIn fraud

The rise of LinkedIn fraud

LinkedIn is among the most popular and profitable social media networks in the world. The platform hosts nearly half a billion users globally, many of whom who pay for subscriptions and features, proving the value of a globally...

Fending off cyber extortion can be difficult

Fending off cyber extortion can be difficult

There is a common theme running through many of the recent massive data breaches: cyber extortion. This new trend is gaining popularity on both corporate and individual level. To effectively combat this threat, a good understanding of...

2015: The most prolific year for OS X malware ever

2015: The most prolific year for OS X malware ever

2015 is a year that will be remembered and pinned for later reference by Apple's software and security engineers. This, is the most prolific year for OS X Malware in history.

Getting your Information Security team right

Getting your Information Security team right

Companies are investing in cybersecurity more than ever and it is a critical and yet a difficult task to bring a team that effectively monitors threats and manages security incidents. Despite the increased trend in spending in...

Be careful in putting your cybertrust in Google, Microsoft and Apple

Be careful in putting your cybertrust in Google, Microsoft and Apple

Security professionals and consumers often feel that they understand cybersecurity just by using words and technical descriptions of product labels, vendors’ marketing campaigns, and manuals. Especially when knowing that we bet on the...

 At what point do white hat hackers cross the ethical line?

At what point do white hat hackers cross the ethical line?

If the intention is pure, does that make it ok?

Load More