Mitchell Parker

Opinions expressed by ICN authors are their own.

Mitchell Parker, CISSP, is the Executive Director, Information Security and Compliance, at Indiana University Health in Indianapolis. Mitch is currently working on redeveloping the Information Security program at IU Health, and regularly works with multiple non-technology stakeholders to improve it. He also speaks regularly at multiple conferences and workshops, including HIMSS, IEEE TechIgnite, and Internet of Medical Things.

Mitch has a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science from Bloomsburg University, a MS in Information Technology Leadership from LaSalle University, and his MBA from Temple University.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Mitchell Parker and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications, Inc., its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

What can we learn about infosec from the Varsity Blues college admissions scandal?

Combatting drama and barriers in the infosec community

Combatting drama and barriers in the infosec community

At its onset, the infosec community was very inclusive and welcoming…when others were not. Over the years, we’ve forgotten where we came from and why. Self-appointed gatekeepers leaders of who belongs in the community (or not) have...

Conspiracy theories and cognitive dissonance…and how to combat them

Conspiracy theories and cognitive dissonance…and how to combat them

Can information security leaders help overcome the challenges wrought by a public that's increasingly ready to believe – and act on – even the wildest conspiracy theories?

Real life, why people escape it – and bringing them back

Real life, why people escape it – and bringing them back

Security isn’t just about technology - that's only 10% of the total solution. Most of what we try and do is build awareness and communication between our team members and the rest of the company. And that requires being active social...

Why hacking leads to less security respect

Why hacking leads to less security respect

If security and risk management continue to be marketed as tools that aren't necessarily complementary to an organization’s strategy, they will continue to be seen as outsiders.

Defense, security and the real enemies

Defense, security and the real enemies

The end of the Cold War meant that the countries that threatened American democracy and our way of life didn’t go away. They adapted to use technology to attack us instead. Now that the extent of these attacks is being made known, we...

Linus Torvalds, the UNIX Wars and history repeating itself

Linus Torvalds, the UNIX Wars and history repeating itself

Linus Torvalds, the creator and maintainer of the Linux Kernel, announced on a mailing list that he was taking time off to address behavioral issues that have caused negativity in the Linux community. This presented business risk and...

Why burnout happens in Information Security

Why burnout happens in Information Security

Burnout happens a lot in the information security field because we put the professionals responsible for it in positions where they are set up to fail. To fix this, we need to stop treating security as an option or hindrance, and let...

How kidney stones help us think better about implementing security

How kidney stones help us think better about implementing security

Sometimes in life we go through very disruptive experiences that make us think about how we can better prepare ourselves. Kidney stones, while small, have that effect. The experiences you have with these can make you think about how...

Rose-colored glasses and sepia-tinted memories

Rose-colored glasses and sepia-tinted memories

We view history through a rose-colored tint. People often leave out the historical context of events and why they occur. Understanding the evolution of systems and their context allows us to better comprehend past decisions and keep...

Cargo cults, certitude, the Byzantine Empire and avoiding the traps of the past

Cargo cults, certitude, the Byzantine Empire and avoiding the traps of the past

We can learn a lot from our history. Both fairly recent historic events such as World War II, and events from the middle ages such as the fall of Constantinople both show us how we react during times of crisis. We can apply lessons...

Negative motivation is not positive engagement

Negative motivation is not positive engagement

The barrage of fearmongering and FOMO over social media and advertising leads to a vicious cycle of negative engagement that builds anger and frustration that can’t be addressed by buying new products. We can break the cycle through...

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