Is your data being sold on the dark web?

Monitoring the dark web to see if your data is being sold there is risky, but solutions and services are available to help.

Become An Insider

Sign up now and get FREE access to hundreds of Insider articles, guides, reviews, interviews, blogs, and other premium content. Learn more.

Sonatype's crown jewel is its database of descriptions of over 1.2 million open source packages. “If that is lost, it could be an existential outcome,” said Wayne Jackson, CEO of the Fulton, Maryland-based software supply chain management company.

To shut down any such leak quickly, Sonatype monitors the web for any indications that its data has been stolen and is being shared on line. That monitoring includes the dark web.

The internet's dark side isn't actually all that big. Media accounts frequently overestimate the size of the dark web by lumping in everything that's not accessible by search engines, and that includes corporate intranets and password-protected sites like online forums, bank websites and email platforms.

According to the FBI, there are only about 800 criminal internet forums worldwide. While their impact might be large, the number of people using them often isn't.

To continue reading this article register now