Mark Cuban's new app leaves messages in the dust, not the cloud

mark cuban

Mark Cuban, owner of the NBA Dallas Mavericks, speaks during the Wall Street Journal Digital Live ( WSJDLive ) conference at the Montage hotel in Laguna Beach, California October 20, 2015.

Credit: REUTERS/Mike Blake

'Dust' enables people to send private, encrypted, self-destructing text messages.

Whisper a secret in someone's ear, not to be repeated. Intimacy and private relationships are basic human rights. Society has gone digital -- and the modern form of whispering to each other is text messaging... except that, it really isn't.

Mark Cuban -- who needs no introduction -- recently told Business Insider, "There's somebody trying to hack you, your email, your company, your credit card company, and everything that you're attached to... and at some point it's going to come out."

We asked Cuban directly about the risks of text messaging, and he shared, "When you hit send on a text, email, DM or even a snap, you no longer own that message. The recipient owns it. But you are responsible for the message and its use, even if it's used grossly out of context."

The remedy? Cuban's Dust app (formerly known as Cyber Dust) aims to bring messaging privacy to the masses. "With Dust, no message touches storage," says Cuban. "Once it is deleted it can not be recovered. Ever."

Cuban informs there's a completely new version coming out shortly -- with a change from Cyber Dust to the shortened Dust moniker. "Dust's protection will become increasingly important as our digital footprints expand -- which is why I use Dust for important business communications and in most cases a replacement for text and DMs" he adds.

The billionaire entrepreneur is hardly a newcomer to sizing market opportunities and capitalizing on them. Microsoft reports that by 2020 4 billion people will be online — twice the number that are online now. Dust has grown its user base from a couple-hundred-thousand to more than 2 million. Given Cuban's propensity for winning in business, it wouldn't be be a surprise to see Dust add a couple of zeroes to the end of its user base figures by 2020.

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