Pro-Russian Ukrainians launch DDoS strike against NATO

A group of pro-Russian Ukrainians hit NATO with a DDoS attack over the weekend, protesting the organization's stance on Crimea's split from the Ukraine.

Cyber Berkut, the name adopted by Ukrainians with a decided pro-Russian view on life, announced on Saturday that they had launched DDoS attacks against three websites operated by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

A spokesperson for NATO confirmed the DDoS issues, noting that no data was compromised during the incident. In a statement, Cyber Berkut called for NATO to "get away from Ukrainian land."

The DDoS started on the eve of Crimea's referendum to split form the Ukraine and join Russia. In a statement on the matter, NATO's secretary general said the voting would be in "direct violation of the Ukrainian constitution and international law."

"Holding this referendum would undermine international efforts to find a peaceful and political solution to the crisis in Ukraine. It would run counter to the principles of the United Nations Charter. It is vital that those principles be upheld..."

However, despite NATO's stance, the Crimeans voted on Sunday in overwhelming numbers to break away from the Ukraine and rejoin Russia. According to reports from the region, more than 90 percent of those who went to the polls were in support of the measure.

As polls closed, the U.S. and EU condemned the referendum as illegal, promising economic sanctions.

During a conversation with Russian President Vladimir Putin, President Obama said that the voting took place "under duress of Russian military intervention" and that it wouldn't be recognized by the U.S. and international community.

Prior to the NATO attacks, the domain for the Kremlin, and the domains of Russia's central bank, foreign ministry, and press agency (Ria Novosti), were subjected to downtime due to a DDoS that was said to be the work of anti-Russian Ukrainians.

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