Adobe issues security fixes for Flash Player

The updates address vulnerabilities that could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.

Adobe has released a security update for Flash Player, fixing holes attackers could exploit to hijack vulnerable systems.

The update is for Adobe Flash Player 11.4.402.287 and earlier versions for Windows and Macintosh, Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.243 and earlier versions for Linux, Adobe Flash Player 11.1.115.20 and earlier versions for Android 4.x, and Adobe Flash Player 11.1.111.19 and earlier versions for Android 3.x and 2.x

From Adobe's bulletin:

--Users of Adobe Flash Player 11.4.402.287 and earlier versions for Windows and Macintosh should update to Adobe Flash Player 11.5.502.110.

--Users of Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.243 and earlier versions for Linux should update to Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.251.

--Flash Player installed with Google Chrome will automatically be updated to the latest Google Chrome version, which will include Adobe Flash Player 11.5.31.2 for Windows, Macintosh and Linux.

--Flash Player installed with Internet Explorer 10 will automatically be updated to the latest Internet Explorer 10 version, which will include Adobe Flash Player 11.3.376.12 for Windows.

--Users of Adobe Flash Player 11.1.115.20 and earlier versions on Android 4.x devices should update to Adobe Flash Player 11.1.115.27.

--Users of Adobe Flash Player 11.1.111.19 and earlier versions for Android 3.x and earlier versions should update to Flash Player 11.1.111.24.

--Users of Adobe AIR 3.4.0.2710 and earlier versions for Windows and Macintosh, SDK (including AIR for iOS) and Android should update to Adobe AIR 3.5.0.600. 

During a recent interview, Brad Arkin -- Adobe's senior director of  security, standards, open source, and accessibility -- told me a huge focus has been getting users updated to the latest, most secure versions of its products.

"We've been putting a lot of incremental improvements into Reader but adoption wasn’t as high as we needed it to be," he said. "In April 2010 we turned on our auto-updater and that's increased deployment significantly. In June 2011 we changed the default setting from semi-auto to silent auto. Users need the update but if asked they won’t want to be bothered. So the goal was to make it so they wouldn’t have to be bothered."

On other fronts, in February 2012 Adobe shipped the background updater for the Windows-based Flash Player and a couple weeks ago the same was done for the Mac version.

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